Home / News & Speeches / Reduce inequalities through images: ICC interviews Anne Boussarie, Vice-President of Getty Images France

As the Vice-President of Getty Images France and jury member on this year’s #PeoplePlanet Photo Award, Anne Boussarie talks to us about the link between cultural representation and gender equality (SDG 5).

The image has become the prime communication tool of the present generation, and that means the way people are represented visually will have greater influence on how we perceive people than any other media.

Do you have in mind an image that you think captures the challenges and/or solutions to SDG 5: Gender equality?

Anne Boussarie: We had the chance to cover the Rio Olympic Games in 2016 through our historic partnership with the International Olympics Committee. Major sporting events are fueled with emotions but also offer us an unfiltered vision of our reality.

The photographs taken by our photographer Alex Livesey following the shared victory of two great athletes – Tony Yoka and Estelle Mossely – are very symbolic: two Gold-medalist winning champions in the same sport, boxing.

Why are you particularly committed to SDG 5: Gender equality? What does it mean to you?

AB: As women, as leaders, it is inevitably an issue that we face everyday. It is our individual and collective responsibility to make gender equality a reality, whether by supporting our colleagues, coaching them, offering a different perspective, or simply listening.

Also, thanks to our talented photojournalists, we are regularly confronted with the situations of women around the world. Through their eyes, we realise that in many parts of the world gender equality is not even considered an issue. I think about the beautiful reportage “Women Around the World” directed by Véronique de Viguerie, as well as Paolo Marchetti’s “Angie’s Wings“, which depicts the predicament of Colombian women whose only options are to become wives and mothers in a very macho environment.

Do you think that Getty Images can improve gender relations and reduce inequalities through images. And how can that be done?

AB: We are proud of our partnership with Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Foundation. In fact, when we see images of women, girls and men, they often fall into the trap of stereotypes that we are trying to fight. We cannot aspire to be what we cannot see represented.

The purpose of the Lean In Collection is to represent women, and family in general, in more positive roles that are closer to reality.

The image has become the prime communication tool of the present generation, and that means the way people are represented visually will have greater influence on how we perceive people than any other media.

Our wish is to defend a modern and realistic vision of gender relations: women in leadership positions, men assuming the roles of teachers and co-workers, and young girls who are strong, intelligent and ambitious. This is also, by extension, another vision of men.

What are you looking for in this year’s entries? What are the criteria for a winning #PeoplePlanet photograph?

AB: Authenticity is key.

The purpose of the Lean In Collection is to represent women, and family in general, in more positive roles that are closer to reality.

For further information, please contact

  • Dawn CHARDONNAL
  • +33 (0)1 49 53 29 07
  • Head, Media Relations and Web