Anti-Counterfeiting

5 ways landlords can help fight counterfeit goods

ICC 5 Ways Landlords Help Fight Counterfeit Goods

Unwitting or not, landlords are key intermediaries in the US$917 billion global trade in counterfeit goods. Here are several steps landlords can take to combat illegal economic activity.

Indian Customs and brands join forces to fight fakes

ICC BASCAP REACT India

Efforts undertaken by Indian Customs to prioritise intellectual property rights (IPR) enforcement and develop an IPR recordal system, due for launch later this year, have been commended at a workshop seeking to combat the trade in counterfeit goods through open and balanced dialogue between Indian enforcement agencies and right holders.

Brand owners raise maritime transport of counterfeit goods at major industry gathering

Brand owners raise maritime transport of counterfeit goods at major industry gathering

Leaders of the freight forwarding and logistics industry gathering for the 56th World Congress of the International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations (FIATA) taking place in Malaysia this week will hear for the first time from a brand owner representative underscoring concern about the global transport of counterfeits and the work being done to tackle the problem.

ICC BASCAP calls for end to use of properties for trade in counterfeit and pirated goods

ICC BASCAP stands against counterfeiting and piracy

A new paper from Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting and Piracy (BASCAP), an initiative of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), reports on the role that landlords and property owners can play as intermediaries in the counterfeit or pirated goods supply chain if they lease their premises to those involved in trademark counterfeiting, copyright piracy or other forms of illicit trade.

5 ways counterfeiting hurts society—and what we can do about it

5 ways counterfeiting hurts society

Counterfeiting and piracy are a form of theft that has been steadily growing in recent years, reaching an estimated value of up to US$917 billion a year for the illegal trade in goods alone. The global value of digital piracy in movies, music and software reached a further US$213 billion in 2015.